Your digital campaign represents your company; it's the public face of your company. Just like your website, your store, your packaging, your employees, your phone tree (Let's hope you have none.) Your digital campaign might be the first encounter of a prospect with your brand. Or it might be a visit with an old friend. Have you ever looked at the personality of your digital campaign?

All brands and their agencies design campaigns with best intentions. Sometimes they succeed. Often they fail and end up where they never wanted to go. I've been part of those and I'm not proud of my personal train wrecks. Advertising intends to motivate behavior change. Can you be motivated by an unlikeable person to change behavior? Shouldn't we all try to be more likeable to customers?

Well, let me introduce you to a few of these people brands create every day.

The cheesy salesman

His perfume is cheap and strong, his clothes outdated and loud, and his pitch is annoying and even louder. Whenever you see him, you try to run away as fast as you can. He tries to sell and upsell anything, as long he profits from it: He doesn't care.

That's the digital campaign with huge "Buy" or "Click" buttons, takeovers, pop-unders, scams to make you "like" the brand: Any trick in the book is good to make you buy. Or at least to make you show some interest. That's the least you can do to keep the cheesy salesman employed.

The creepy guy

You meet him at a party, have a brief chat with him and he believes you want to get married to him. Wherever you go, he's there: At the gym, at work, in your home. He continues to ask the same question: "Why don't we close the deal?" He's the guy that makes you feel uncomfortable, a Big Brother always watching. If you could, you would punch him in the face but he might take that as a sign that you want to close the deal.

As a digital campaign, these are the re-targeting slaves. Yes, I showed interest in your airline 1 week ago but that doesn't mean you need to remind me on every page I visit, thanks to your massive ad network/retargeting buy. A friend might have sent me a link to your offer, I checked it out and didn't care. Make me care even less by retargeting me 5,012 times. Maybe it works at the 5,013th impression. Who knows?

Paris Hilton

Ok, she looks good. But, ask her what time it is and she needs an assistant because her brain is permanently turned off. Ask her to do anything and she'll answer with a frozen smile. She's stupid, she can't do anything, and the world adored her at one point. Oh, did I mention she's pretty?

As a digital marketing campaign, that's the flashturbation campaign. So much Rich Media, you can pay the global debt with it. Too bad it doesn't work on all devices, crashes your computer and serves no conversion purpose. Oh, did I mention it looks pretty?

The cheerleader

Who doesn't love cheerleaders? Your team sucks, no one in the stands, it's raining, they ran out of beer and the cheerleader is still smiling, yelling: Go team. They don't understand why you don't like their team, why you don't share the same level of enthusiasm. No matter, in their mind their own team will always be the best. Even though they haven't won a game in 10 years.

As a digital campaign, this is the campaign that doesn't get why you wouldn't "like" their Facebook page even though there's no reason for you to like it. No value proposition. Why wouldn't you follow a Twitter stream brimming with promotional messages? Why do you need motivation to change your behavior? Isn't our presence motivation enough?

The cheapskate

He's the guy occupying the parking lot of Best Buy the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. He's the guy that occupies the coffee shop for hours with an order of a miniature coffee. He's the guy sitting next to the toilet, the guy that gets the worst seat in the bar. He doesn't care. As long as it's cheap, he's happy.

The digital campaign you don't see. Cheap inventory equals invisibility. Banner ads below the fold on sites you don't dare visiting because they look like malware-infested 1990 designs. The cheapskate loves the cheesy sales guy on the publisher site. It's a mutual feeling: the sales guy sells garbage and the cheapskate sifts through it, filled with happiness.

Uwe Hook is the CEO and Co-Founder of BatesHook, Inc. (www.bateshook.com) and a veteran of the advertising and marketing industry with the goal of building connections between people and brands. Uwe can be reached at uwe@bateshook.com.

Read all Uwe's MediaBizBloggers commentaries at Subversions.

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